Monday, 11 December 2017

Humans are underrated

This is the book I'm currently studying.

It will definitely make my recommended reading list.

While I love how technology can enhance the human experience I'm tired of all the technology talk about digital and data being the be all and end all and so I'm drawn to books like this.

A key insight so far is that human interaction rules our lives.

The author says "It's even more valuable than we may realize. In a surprising number of ways it holds the key to our value."

Who will you become? What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 8 December 2017

Are these 6 school problems also in your business?

These problems exist in organisations too. Are they in yours?



Who will you become? What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 6 December 2017

Monday, 4 December 2017

What you're accountable for and what you're not

I'd guess that the number one topic I have conversations with my clients about would be accountability.

When it's said and done I'm accountable for my intentions, feelings, thoughts and behaviours. So are you.

We all get into trouble when we try and take accountability for other people's intentions, feelings, thoughts and behaviours.

Who will you become? What will you do next?


Possible Next Step:

Take the Reasons, Relationships, and Routines Guarantee Results complimentary course from here where you can watch the compete/collaborate video and download the Changing What's Normal book.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 29 November 2017

Change processes and the predictability they help create

All the talk is about VUCA


Very few people are talking about the other side of the coin and even less about the edge of the coin. There are 3 sides to every story!

In my world, while accepting VUCA, I help people to focus on the opposites - Dependable, Predictable, Simple and Clear.

VUCA is certainly one side of the story and we should never ignore it. Focusing on the bright side of dependable, predictable, simple and clear leads to a better life and better business results.

This post is about predictable.

A key to predictability is your change process. Do you have one?

Here's mine

The last thing you need is a change program or even worse change management which is an oxymoron!

A change process helps us to live in the moment and to take one true quantum leap at time and therefore make our lives as predictable as possible.

Who will you become? What will you do next to make your life and work more predictable.

The edge of coin referenced above is controlling the controllables. More insight on this here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

PS Like some help with this? Please call me on +61 418 807 898. You will be under no obligation. Sometime just a quick off-the-record chat is all that's needed.

Monday, 27 November 2017

Why do we need amendments when laws are already in place?

The 15th November 2017 was a significant day in Australia's history as we announced the results of a question put to the people about same sex marriage. Below are the results:

An overwhelming victory for Yes which compels the politicians to change the law.

Since the announcement politicians have been debating the bill to change the law lodged the day after the above announcement.

Debate has centred around so-called protection for religious, conscience, speech and education rights.

This has mystified me because marriage in Australia is a civil ceremony not a religious one. The marriage law (old and new) has nothing to do with conscience, speech or education and certainly not religion.

About 70% of marriages here are conducted by civil celebrants. My wife is one. Even when religious people conduct a ceremony they must be an approved authority by the Attorney General's Department and say the legal words.

What's mystified me most however is that there already seems to be adequate protection for religious and indeed non-religious people.

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) is a multilateral treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly with resolution 2200A (XXI) on 16 December 1966, and in force from 23 March 1976 in accordance with Article 49 of the covenant.

On the Australian Human Rights Commission website site I read the following:

The right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion is recognised in Article 18 of the ICCPR.  

Article 18 protects not only the ‘traditional’ religious beliefs of the major religions, but also non-theistic and atheistic beliefs, as well as the right not to profess any religion or belief. The right recognised in Article 18 is simultaneously an individual right, and a collective right.

Why debate?

Beats me.

The only conclusion I can make is that the no voters are still trying to get their way through the back door. It's disgraceful I think. You?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Leadership Valueology

In my previous two posts about thriving on the challenges of change here and following the appreciative leader change process here, I've set the scene for this post about leadership valueology.

The Art, Practice and Legacy Of Being A Leadership Valueologist book will complete the trilogy of work that began with a personal experience in early 2007. This book will primarily be case studies from people who undertake the experience. Learn more here.

In 2007 I was privileged to present to members of the board of Oxfam Australia.  While waiting in their boardroom I copied down the words of a poster on the wall by Community Aid Abroad.  It was headed ‘Basic human rights for all’ and read

*enough to eat
*clean water
*a livelihood
*a home
*an education
*health care
*a safe environment
*protection from violence
*equality of opportunity
*a say in the future

Tears welled in my eyes as I read these words for they capture what I stand for and explain why I got up this morning and every morning and go out into the world to influence leaders in whatever you do to be doing it for the good of people and our planet.

Legacy is a part of the mission of every authentic leader. For me it's being able to remark on hence my use of the word remarkable for more than 25 years.

Very soon after the encounter with Oxfam in 2007 I began to create a workable model to help my clients thrive on the challenges of change and be appreciative. It centred around people feeling valued, living values and delivering value

Helping people to become Leadership Valueologist's is the next stage of the process.

Leadership Valueologist - person fully committed to the art, life-long learning, unlearning and relearning, and daily practice of fully appreciating and getting the best out of themselves and other people.

Join in the journey yourself from here.

Who will you become? What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 20 November 2017

Thriving on the challenges of change leads to a special appreciation of what's possible

Here's the message of my previous post:


Thriving on the challenges of the above journey takes your leadership to what I call the Appreciation level reflected in the following change process:


I am deeply indebted to the work of many people who use the concept of Appreciative Inquiry, the work of Duarte, and to my Grandfather Sherriff for teaching me the law of the farm.


The fertile ground is Appreciating what is (the remarkable, the great, the good, and the bad and the ugly).

The better you Appreciate what is, the more fully you can Imagine what can be (the ploughing).

Clarity around what can be enables precise planning around the tiny shifts (Quantum leaps - the seeding) that you will take to move from what is to what can be.

Leaping (the nurturing) leads to the harvest of positive momentum, which is the key to achieving better business results, at less personal cost.

One quantum leap at a time action is also the best way that I know of to reduce stress.



Inside The Appreciative Leader handbook are considerations and possible actions you can take to co-create and implement a change process for your business. You'll never need to think about a change program ever again.

Find out more about the handbook, and the associated companion resources web page and private online community here.

At the companion resources web page via the above link you’ll see examples of specific actions.

Who will you become? What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

PS I’m very grateful to the work of John Kotter on leading change. For many years while developing the Appreciate - Imagine - Create - Leap - Momentum process I used in my own best way his 8 steps process in my work with many clients.

There’s an excellent ebook about Kotter’s 8 steps here. 

Friday, 17 November 2017

All change is personal first


My Changing What's Normal book is a course in making the above reality.

You can download the book and do the course with my compliments from here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 15 November 2017

The Art, Practice and Legacy Of Being A Leadership Valueologist

I've been focusing my 'deep work' of the past 6 months on this final part of the trilogy that began with my Changing What's Normal book in 2011, and continued with The Appreciative Leader handbook in 2016.

The book version that I plan to publish in 2019 or 2020 will primarily be case studies about people who undertake the scheduled experiences, learn more here, or an in house experience, learn more here.

I am very excited about this work and look forward to seeing you register or to exploring in house options with you.

Be remarkable.
Ian


Monday, 13 November 2017

Thriving in the new world of work



The short video above offers some good insights into the current and emerging new world of work.

In my view technology is a key to this new world yet only when it is used to enhance the human experience. Such is the real key and using it well unlocks a wonderful new world.

On Monday the 27th of November 2017 I'm hosting a candid and convivial conversation about the new world of work. Below is a 2 minutes and 39 seconds preview.



Places are limited for 27th November. Find out more and register here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 10 November 2017

Controlling the controllables via The Obstacle Is The Way

I'm currently studying this great Ryan Holiday's book and the subject of stoicism.

One of the highlights has been to revisit, reframe and take action on what we describe in the vernacular as 'controlling the controllables.'

“In life our first job is this, to divide and distinguish things into two categories: externals I cannot control, but the choices I make with regard to them I do control. Where will I find good and bad? In me, in my choices. — Epictetus

More great insights from Ryan and other stoics here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Ensuring learning and development leads to measurable results

A key finding from a recent Argosight survey indicated that the central challenge to creating a robust and effective employee learning program is:

"Aligning employee development to learning content and tying learning to measurable business results."

This of course is a perennial challenge.

I address one profound solution in my blue paper:


You can download the paper and do the complimentary course from here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 6 November 2017

Constitutions and common-sense (and the lack thereof)

The former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia Barnaby Joyce is currently campaigning to win back his job after being forced out of the parliament because he was deemed illegible by the High Court because he unwittingly had citizenship of another country. Mr Joyce is one of several politicians suffering this fate.

There's no suggestions whatsoever that anyone deemed ineligible has committed treason or is involved in conspiracy yet if you listen to the media and opposition politicians you would think so.

Hyperbole (exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally) is one way to describe their despicable behaviour. Another is political expediency, and another rank self-righteous, self-interested opportunism.

What happened to common sense? Yet again it's missing and more tax payers money is being spent totally unnecessarily.

As far as I can tell there are many things in the Australia constitution that need updating like still referring to pounds in some sections whereas dollars have been our currency since 1966.

image courtesy of rootreport.com
The simple no cost solution to the constitution crisis of dual citizenship in Australia

Give everyone amnesty for their foolishness and carelessness and move on. No needless by-elections or other wasting of taxpayers money.

Lesson for your business

What policies, procedures, practices, processes, systems need to better reflect reality?

Where does hyperbole, self-righteousness and self-interest exist in your business? How will you get rid of it.

If your business has a constitution, charter or whatever, when was it last updated? Does it accurately reflect what you want it to?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 3 November 2017

Last time this year for the remarkable is the new normal conversation

One of my most popular candid and convivial conversations online is Remarkable is the new normal. 

It's on for the final time this year at 4.30 p.m. AEDT next Monday November 6th. It's complimentary. You must register here. Registrations close at 11.30 p.m. tonight.

At the registration link you can download the workbook pictured.


Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 1 November 2017

Could trust be your ultimate competitive advantage?

There are many great lessons in this article by Andy Raskin about pitching. For me the following in the second last paragraph is the standout.

"Product differentiation, by itself, has become indefensible because today’s competitors can copy your better, faster, cheaper features virtually instantly. Now, the only thing they can’t replicate is the trust that customers feel for you and your team."


Who will you become? What will you do? to increase trust levels between your employees and with your customers?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 30 October 2017

What I'd do after firing all of the politicians

To say that I'm dissatisfied with the results of politics would be a large understatement.

In the main what we're getting is mediocrity.

Here's the 9 actions I'd take to replace current arrangements that exist in democracies.

1) Make political parties and factions illegal.

(The only good thing I can see so far from the Trump fiasco is that he has demonstrated that non politicians can win elections.)

2) People who stand for election must be able to demonstrate their ability to collaborate and to lead.

(The idea that we have opposition parties and allow them to say no to whatever the Government suggests is so 19th century.) (The idea that they are holding the Government to account is nonsense. We the people are the only ones who can do that.)


3) Make political donations and lobby groups of any kind illegal as well as influence from religious groups or other belief systems.

(You can believe whatever you like. I respect that. When making decisions for all however bias to personal beliefs is an oxymoron)

4) Give all candidates the same limited amount from the public purse to conduct their campaigns and don't allow rich people to out spend anyone else.

5) Vote for a leader and let that person pick their team from those elected. Those not selected to the leadership team (ministers or whatever) would have equal say into the performance standards of the team.

6) Make 10 years or two terms the maximum time people can serve.

7) No person who has been a politician in the past would be able to stand for election again.

8) Reconfigure accountability for public servants so that the buck stops with those executing the strategy of the leadership.

(It's a given that the executors would have input into and own the strategy).

9) In Australia I'd eliminate state governments and just have local and federal governments. Included in this over time would be a move to uniformity of laws regarding education, health, aged care and other areas that affect citizens everywhere.

What would you add to or change from the above?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 27 October 2017

Complimentary personal and business development courses

I'm excited to let you know that my complimentary personal and business development courses are now accessible from the one web page.

You can get started here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 25 October 2017

Seeing the world as it is and making it more like it could be

I'm a big fan of Seth Godin. I often reflect on his words opposite and leave the time of reflection with renewed energy to make a difference in my own best way.

I think self-disruption is a key to ongoing differencemaking.

The following, which I found in an article by David Clarke here, is a brilliant way to go about self-disruption as a business:

"(My company name) didn’t kill the (my industry) business.

We disrupted ourselves by (constructing an entirely differentiated experience).

Anybody can follow a path into the future by walking in the ruts that others have made. Today’s intrepid pioneers are those who carve out their own roads in unforgiving terrain."

Self-disruption in your business is essential to create your best future. So too is disrupting yourself as an individual. Below are links to previous posts to refresh your memory about disrupting yourself personally.

The great disruption is to disrupt yourself

In order to disrupt the status quo we must disenthrall


Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 23 October 2017

When metrics are meaningful

I know from 26 years of work with more than 1000 business owners and leaders worldwide is that a sure-way way to better business results at less personal cost is to increase the number of people in your organisation being remarkable and doing meaningful to them and highly valuable to others work.

Remarkable. Meaningful. Valuable.

Therefore when I came across this paper I devoured it straight away.

You can learn more about this paper and those who wrote it here.

Aside from the use of the word economy which I detest the paper is a great contribution to the new world of work and the new world in general.

You can read my Amazon review here.

My 3 key takeaways from the paper:

1) Intangible assets now dominate the value of companies. 87% in 2015 compared to 17% in 1975!

2) Our fears provide us with reasons to change behaviour.

3) A reinforcement of my knowing that value behaviours are meaningful to us all and can be turned into metrics.

I also found the diagram below worth reflecting on and a good see where you're at where you can go pointer:


Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Further reading particularly if you're not familiar with my work 

Why we're all remarkable here and here.

Download my ebook Meaningful Work and The Meaning of Life by scrolling down here.

Friday, 20 October 2017

Determining the road less travelled

The book that really inspired me in the 70's to make self-development a life-long quest was 'The Road Less Traveled' by M. Scott Peck. The title was inspired by the famous Robert Frost poem.
Today when I have a choice of two roads or more I have a preference to take the one I feel will most likely help me and/or other people to disrupt the status quo when sameness is no longer serving.

Image by Miguel Cortes

Often there doesn't seem to be much difference about the roads ahead and so closer examination is required. The following are the questions I ask:

Will taking this road inspire me (and/or other people) to become more of whom I'm capable of becoming?

Will taking this road mean greater value delivery?

Will the culture (world, community, team etc etc) be enhanced if I take this road?

Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

What are the differences between propaganda and news?

My trusty Google dictionary says propaganda is:
information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote a political cause or point of view.

as an aside it also says
a committee of cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church responsible for foreign missions, founded in 1622 by Pope Gregory XV.

I laughed out loud when I read this second definition.

When I Google fake news I get the following from Wikipedia
Fake news is a type of yellow journalism or propaganda that consists of deliberate misinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional print and broadcast news media or online social media.[1] Fake news is written and published with the intent to mislead in order to gain financially or politically, often with sensationalist, exaggerated, or patently false headlines that grab attention.

When I Google news the following is prominent
newly received or noteworthy information, especially about recent events.
and information not previously known to (someone).


Why am I on this trail?

Recently while enjoying conversation over a coffee with my wife in one of our favourite coffee shops it suddenly occurred to me that everyone else in the shop was on their so-called smart phones! This observation led us to explore what news is.

One of my conclusions is that we mostly scroll, watch and listen to news that is actually someone else's propaganda. This is a major distraction in our lives that has us trapped.

What's your thoughts? I would genuinely like to know. Please email ian@ianberry.biz I'll publish your answers (with permission) here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 16 October 2017

When one side deserves to lose and the other doesn't deserve to win

Referring to his home state Nick Xenophon on announcing his intention to quit Federal politics and contest a state seat said "We have a government that deserves to lose, and an Opposition that does not deserve to win."

Source of quote 

This is a very sad state of affairs that I believe applies to all levels of politics worldwide. Mediocrity is a consequence.

What's also interesting is that Xenophon still has 5 years to sit in the Senate so his decision is driven by self-interest more than the national interests or the interests of his state which he loudly proclaimed as his reasoning for forming a party and gaining extra Senate seats.

I despair at politics and political systems worldwide.

The key lesson for business leaders is say what you mean and mean what you say about your purpose, and never abandon it.

Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 13 October 2017

There's always more in situations than we initially see

There are many great examples of serendipity throughout history - the discovery of penicillin and the inventions of the microwave oven and the Post-it note get a mention on Wikipedia.

How about in your life?

Serendipity traditionally means discovering something good without looking for it.

I find in reality that the more I look for what else is, might be or could be in circumstances and situations the more I discover.

I find this particularly so when I look for the good, the great and the remarkable in situations where there's conflict, difficulty or disagreement.

When things don't go according to plan asking What if?, What else and What can be? are great questions to ask.


Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes."
Marcel Proust

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Value and Values Based Businesses Continue Their Rise


Here's my first post on this topic on 6th February 2012.

High values, high value business are continuing their rise for 3 key reasons:

1) Generation Next, currently aged 36 and younger, will soon be half the workforce. They are attracted to organisations who live their values more than any group of people ever have been

In previous surveys, Millennials have told us that businesses’ greatest contribution was the financial benefit associated with job creation—but they see this as an outcome rather than a guiding principle of business conduct. So, to better understand their values, we asked Millennials, “What are the most important values a business should follow if it is to have long-term success?” They responded that businesses should put employees first, and they should have a solid foundation of trust and integrity. Customer care and high-quality, reliable products also ranked relatively high in importance. Attention to the environment and social responsibility were also mentioned by a significant number of Millennials.

Source The Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016

One of the keys to values is that they must be behaviours not words as I explore in the 4 minutes 35 seconds video below:



2) Machine's are taking over routine work and therefore it's easier that it's ever been to find your dream role

Machines can do algorithmic work. Soon they will do most of what's simple, routine and repetitive.

This represents a great opportunity for us humans.

According to 80000hours.org there's 3 keys to finding a dream job

"The bottom line
To find a dream job, look for:

Work you’re good at,
Work that helps others,
Supportive conditions: engaging work that lets you enter a state of flow; supportive colleagues; lack of major negatives like unfair pay; and work that fits your personal life."

The full article where I found the above is here. 

In my work I go a step further and help people to do remarkable, meaningful to them and highly valuable to others work.

There's a plethora of research about this. The premier book to read is 'Deep Work' by Cal Newport. Learn more about this here.

A key to helping people to do remarkable, meaningful to them and highly valuable to others work is through what I call the number one role of leadership, 'enhancing their (your) gifts. I explore this in the  4 minutes and 57 seconds video below.



3) The rules have changed in the new world of work

Two of the books that I added to my top 21 recommended reading list last year were and The Purpose Economy and Technology vs Humanity.

You can read my full Amazon review here.

There's is much to love about this book. Three aspects that I love in particular are:

1) The idea of exponential humanism "the philosophy to find a way forward that will allow us to embrace technology but not become technology, to use it as a tool not as purpose."

2) The concept of "key human indicators" as a far better way forward than the traditional and tired KPI's.


3) The insight of androrithms "those qualities that makes us human" having more meaning than algorithms.


I personally don't like the use of word economy. I get it's currency. No pun intended. I don't like the use of the term 'Fourth Industrial Revolution' either.

A shift I've noticed in my lifetime is the economy has moved from being part of society to society being part of the economy.

I for one don't believe this shift has been a healthy or helpful one.

Nevertheless this book is an all time favourite. It contains great case studies.

I particularly like the 12 New Work Rules put forward in this book pictured below.

How will you better embrace the new world of work?

How will you increase the number of people in your organisation doing remarkable, meaningful to them and highly valuable to others work?

How will you better turn your values into behaviours?

Be remarkable.
Ian

PS If you'd love some short term help go here and then contact me.

Monday, 9 October 2017

Adopting the Rule of three for better meetings, emails and other messaging

Image courtesy of organisational physics.com

I unwittingly slumped in my chair a little as my client told me he was back to spending 50% of his time reacting or responding to emails, and about 30% of his time locked in meetings where mostly he was wondering why he was there.

“I know, I know” he blurted out loud in frustration and in response to my slump.

I regained my composure and engaged in conversation with my client using my four standard accountability conversation questions:

What happened?

What do you need to do to get back on track?

Is their anything I can do to help you?

Anything else?

As a consequence my client mapped out the following course of action. It may help you as much as it’s helped him get his life, his time and his mojo back.

Firstly three key principles to apply in your own best way:

1) You have control over most of the 168 hours you have at your disposal every week.
2) The consequences of pushing back on unsolicited, unwarranted or unclear requests are never as bad as you think they might be.
3) "The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated." William James

3 rules for better meetings encompassed in the one rule of only participating in meetings that have one of the three as their purpose

1) Assessment/review of data meetings where the purpose is to extract usable insight.

2) Decision-making meetings where an agreed process is followed.

3) Learning and development meetings where there's been pre-work and when there will be post work to integrate the learning with what you're already doing well.

It's a disappointing waste of time, resources and talent to spend money to work on a problem that actually should be a conversation first.
Seth Godin

More from Seth on meetings here.

3 rules for a better email experience

1) Only write and respond to emails twice a day.

2) Only send emails that inform, inspire or invite.

3) Only read email newsletters and other subscriptions once a week.

3 rules for other forms of message exchange

1) Let other people know your preferred ways to receive information. Mine is telephone and second preference texting where text is short and sweet with a link if appropriate and clear expectation of a reply request or not.

2) Ask people what their preferred way/s are for receiving information from you are and do that.

3) Use proven digital collaboration tools when working on projects with other people.

Here's a review of 10 online collaboration tools

Who will you become? What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

PS Below are 3 further articles I've found valuable on the topics of meaningful meetings, emails and messaging in general.

Thought Leaders Global Founder Matt Church on elemental meetings

How to stop wasting time a guide to more effective meetings from Brian Neese and Alvernia University

Three key actions real leaders take every day

and here is a bonus two page manifesto for best practice in communication in general that I wrote way back in 2005 yet still highly relevant today.

Friday, 6 October 2017

The 7 really useful models on video

Below are the short video profiles of each of my 7 really useful models for building and sustaining remarkable workplace cultures. Total viewing time is around 30 minutes.

You can view them as a playlist on YouTube here.

I'm conducting a very special online conversation about the models and how you can use them in your own best way on October 16th. Find out more and register here. 



Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

VUCA is only one side of the story

You've no doubt heard of VUCA


I like the approach of Kevin Roberts in what he calls SUPER VUCA. He says

"Our job as creative leaders is to turn a volatile, uncertain. complex and ambiguous world, into one that is vibrant, unreal, crazy and astounding."

Watch under 5 minutes from Kevin on this here.

In my world while accepting VUCA I help people to focus on the opposites - Dependable, Predictable, Simple and Clear.

VUCA is certainly one side of the story and we should never ignore it, however focusing on the bright side of dependable, predictable, simple and clear leads to a better life and better business results.

Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 2 October 2017

Remarkable people have ditched dogma and instead lead by example

One of my 14 principles for being remarkable is:

Remarkable people have ditched dogma and instead lead by example.

When I Google the meaning of dogma I get
“a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true.”

Dogma is trouble wherever you find it. It's where what someone in authority says is more important than the original sound principle on which the dogma is based.

We see this in religion of course where a good principle articulated by Buddha as below for example is overruled by dogma (and therefore behaviour) making a lie of the good principle.

“All spirituality is about relieving suffering.” Buddha

Dogma being what we follow and how we behave, rather than living by the good principle on which the dogma is based in our own best way, is true in most places including your workplace.

Steve Jobs got it right I reckon when he said "Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking."


The great spiritual leader Mahatma Gandhi articulated what I think is a principle highly relevant in all of life. He said

"Be the change that you wish to see in the world."

One of the key questions I ask my clients is "How can you better be the change you want to see in your workplace?" Honest answers lead to ditching dogma and leading by example.

Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 29 September 2017

Don’t wait for your boss to receive appreciation

Helping my clients to apply the appreciation principle in their own best way is central to all of my work.

“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.” - William James

Not just any principle, the deepest.

Obviously we all need to feel appreciated.

Often I invoke another proven principle to get the appreciation ball rolling:


Start today to better show appreciation to your:

partner

children

neighbours

friends

family

boss

co-workers

customers

suppliers

Show appreciation to everyone you meet.

What goes around comes around (another proven principle).

Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Introducing Carol the celebrant - heart-crafted life-changing ceremonies

Thrilled that my wife Carol has fulfilled a dream by becoming a marriage celebrant.

If you’re getting married in Geelong or the Bellarine or Surf Coast please give Carol a call.

Here's her website and contact details.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 25 September 2017

It's not the platform or process you use, it's the conversations that really count

I was interested to see an email recently promoting a webinar by Chloe Hawcroft (Director, People Capability, People & Culture, AMP) and Karin Hawkins (Principal Consultant, NeuroLeadership Institute) about Perform@AMP. Below is some of the copy:

"AMP saw that the quality of conversations matters.

Perform@AMP helps leaders to have the right conversations and tailor them to the needs of individuals. It positioned employees as ‘owning’ their own performance and development; learning, collaboration and adaptability as central to performance; feedback as ‘sharing reflections’ focused on growth; and set up employees to be active and intentional about their development.

In 2017, Perform@AMP was nominated and won Australia’s Good Design Award, one of the longest standing and most prestigious design awards in the world, promoting excellence in design and innovation."

A Google search led me to the video below: You can view the video direct here.



It's great to see a major business adopting an approach like this.

Since 1991 I've been helping business owners and leaders worldwide to focus on communication and conversations more than the platform or process. In case you missed it my most recent post on the subject 'Just in case you haven't yet ditched performance appraisals' is here.

I use the following model to help my clients:


Should you like some help with becoming remarkable at communication and conversations that count please contact me on +61 418 807 898.

You can also participate in a special conversation online about the above model and 6 others. It's on October 16th. Details and registration here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 22 September 2017

The Appreciative Leader Pioneers, Innovators and Role Models Program

I've entered swansong territory in my business career. I'm anticipating a 3 to 5 year journey!

A key is my online program that helps you to integrate the seven really useful models for building and sustaining remarkable workplace cultures pictured below with what you are already doing that's working well for you.

Here's how the program works.

To learn more about the these models you can participate in the complimentary conversation on October 16th. You can learn more and register here.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Your Success = less rules and more applying proven principles in your own best way


The above photograph by Cultura Creative features in this great article by Eric J. McNulty.

He's an extract

"Lou Gerstner turned IBM around using what was then a groundbreaking idea: managing by principles rather than procedures."

I have a slightly different take. Leadership for me is all about applying proven principles in your own best way.

There must be some processes, policies, procedures, practices and systems (PPPPS's). Imagine the lack of them for example in an operating theatre! These PPPPS's are modern management and they are best designed by the people doing the work.


Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 18 September 2017

How to make your business 10 times better, faster and cheaper

I have just completed a study of this book and have no hesitation in adding it to my recommended reading list.

Whatever the status of your business and your goals for the future of it there are many principles inside this book that you can apply in your own best way.

The book contains lots of case studies and profiles of what it takes to lead an ExO organisation ((I say any organisation that wants to truly make a difference).

The book is written in a easy to understand style which is refreshing given the complexities of the subject matter.

This book lives up to it's claim of being a how to for making your business 10 times better, faster and cheaper.

The book provides an easy to follow model as pictured below and a comprehensive guide to taking action.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 15 September 2017

Two often unseen faces of influence

The following words attributed to Angela Merkel are perhaps a key to her longevity and influence.


And Shakespeare had a similar take

These are the often unseen faces of influence.

Who will you become?

What will you do next?

Be remarkable.
Ian