Friday, 10 July 2020

We all win when everyone is playing their role

This post is preceded by the short video and post here.

In writing more of my Heart-leadership book this week my focus was on joy. Today’s post part of what I wrote.


Upgrading to role clarity statements


With your people document who their customers are (relationships) and what value must be delivered to and/or exchange with each person.

Here's a template:

I’ve helped 100’s of my clients to dispense with job descriptions and replace them with role clarity statements. Below are the headings we use. 

In conjunction with Performance Possibility Plans or plans-on-a-page that I explore here, role clarity statements enable conversations about performance to be elevated and lead to greater accountability.

Do this work and in the space of a few weeks you can expect greater value being delivered and exchanged by everyone, meaning happier employees and happier external customers.

What would you and your employees write under these headings?


Workplace or Business Purpose
Role Purpose
Key Accountabilities and Responsibilities
Key Performance Measures and Key Human Indicators (Lead measures)
Key Relationships of the role and the value that must be delivered to each person
Key outcomes of role (Lag measures)
Required levels of commitment (will) and competency (skill)
Key gifts/talents (essence) required and that need to be enhanced to excel in role and prepare for future roles
Learning and development and career path opportunities

All of the above can be outlined on two sides of an A4 page at the most.


People don't have jobs. We have relationships with other people where value delivery and exchange is paramount to the enjoyment of the relationships and the success of workplace.

Hawthorn Football Club case study and Bill’s story


In 2015 the Hawthorn Football Club won their third successive Australian Football League (AFL) premiership. This feat has only been achieved 6 times in the history of the AFL.

I'm not a supporter of the club. I do admire them greatly.

Their Play Your Role campaign is one action you can emulate and immediately improve your business. Learn more here. 

For over a quarter of a century I've been helping my clients to dispense with job descriptions and replace them with role clarity statements. It all began when I met Bill.

Bill's story


I first met Bill in the early nineties. I was in the early days of doing discovery work into how I could best help Bill's organisation. This meant meeting with lots of people in the offices and factory.

I began to notice that each time I exited a conversation Bill was close by leaning on his broom.

Soon curiosity got the better of me and so I made a beeline for Bill. After explaining who I was and what I was doing I asked Bill "So what's your role?" "I thought you'd never ask me." he replied and then said "I'm the Assistant to the Managing Director.”

Bill's job was Head Cleaner. His role was of far greater significance.

I invested several hours with Bill and learned everything I needed to know about the organisation. Included in what I learned from Bill were two insights he had previously passed on to the management team that they had failed to act on. When they did take action the bottom-line improved by 4 million dollars!

What have your employees been sharing with you lately that you haven't yet acted on?!

Like the Hawthorn Football Club every person working in your business has a key role. Not just the star players, every human being. If you're focused on a few and not the many you're missing a magic opportunity in your business.

When everyone is playing their role we all win.

One simple yet profound action. Lead with your heart. Learn about relationships.

Begin today to have conversations with your employees about their roles.

Over time get rid of job descriptions and replace them with role clarity statements.

Do Your Work.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Wednesday, 8 July 2020

People don’t have jobs. We have roles

In my writing this week of my Heart-leadership book part of my focus was on roles.



One of the most deeply demotivating documents in the workplace is the job description!


The problem I see with most job descriptions is that they list tasks and say very little about relationships or value delivery, the two matters about which every role in your business must be about. And often down the bottom of the form are the words "and anything else as directed.” As I say highly demotivating.

Job descriptions are a hangover from the Industrial Revolution and they still cause headaches.

Role clarity statements, my recommended replacement for job descriptions, improve well-being.

Dispense with job descriptions and watch your people soar.

Every person in your workplace has a role to deliver value to and to exchange value with other people. Value that we all demand, desire, and feel that we deserve. I sometimes refer to these as must have’s, should have’s and nice-to-haves.

"Your customer is whoever gets your work next." said the great Japanese management thinker Kaoru Ishikawa.

I highly recommend taking Iskikawa’s concept to heart and undertake a value delivery and exchange review and then in collaboration upgrade everyone’s role clarity statements.

Here's a template


Workplace or Business Purpose
Role Purpose
Key Accountabilities and Responsibilities
Key Performance Measures and Key Human Indicators (Lead measures)
Key Relationships of the role and the value that must be delivered to each person
Key outcomes of role (Lag measures)
Required levels of commitment (will) and competency (skill)
Key gifts/talents (essence) required and that need to be enhanced to excel in role and prepare for future roles
Learning and development and career path opportunities

All of the above can be outlined on two sides of an A4 page at the most.


More about role clarity in this Friday's post and podcast.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 6 July 2020

Having "an attitude of gratitude"

My wife and I walk with our dog Molly every day, rain, hail or shine.

A ritual we have adopted is to express out loud what we're grateful for. It really sets up the remainder of the day for us.


We're well practiced in gratitude. We know that being truly grateful for what we have leads to more of what we need.

Being grateful is something I have practiced daily now for 43 years. It was as a 23 year old that I faced a life-threatening operation with a 1 in 5 survival rate. I became the 1 largely because my surgeon taught me gratitude. In preparing for the operation that saved my life I followed his instructions to stand in front of the mirror and say out loud "I have an attitude of gratitude." I have been carrying out this ritual every day since.

In the best and worst of times I have learned that being grateful and having "an attitude of gratitude" is the key to living a happy and contented life.

Having "an attitude of gratitude" is a foundation stone of heart-leadership.


Be remarkable.
Ian

Friday, 3 July 2020

Radiate joy even when your work is hard

In writing more of my Heart-leadership book this week my focus was on joy. Today’s post part of what I wrote.


Listen to the podcast version of this post


Several years ago my wife and I completed the restoration of a 100 year old property that took us several years part time.  We cried as our friends and family shared the joy of the finished product.  It was amazing to see the old house with a fresh coat of paint they said. 


What was unmentioned was the untold hours of back breaking work and the preparation to get ready to put on the finishing touches of a coat of paint on that made our home look so grand.


All great work is like this. 


Often we feel joy at the end of something rather than recognising our joy throughout as well as on completion.


My wife and I, even when exhausted, were in the habit of stepping back and admiring our progress even when such still looked like a mess. We grew accustomed to finding joy even when the work is hard.


We have a crest adorning a wall in our home.  The Latin words underneath translate “Nothing without labour”.


We believe this was the creed of our family from a very, very long time ago.  Marketing people never invented tag lines!  


Whether it is our families credo or not I certainly learned the value of hard work from an early age.  


Barely a teenager with my brother four years younger, we built our family home (all except the bricks and tiles on the roof) with our parents and with our bare hands.  I remember once my football coach saying to my Father  “Your boy has a great work ethic.” My father surprised at the remark simply replied “He knows the value of hard work.”


I do know the value of hard work. My real learning though has come through ensuring that the work is joyful even when it’s hard.


Having a great work ethic is important to being a person of value and to delivering and exchanging value. What is key however is finding joy in the work.


One of the most profound statements I have ever heard comes from the great book ‘The Radical Leap’ by Steven Farber.  It’s a wonderful fable with a great message. Steven says “Do what you love in the service of people who love what you do”


What an insight eh?


I woke up this morning as I do every morning ready to work hard. I know that nothing of value is created or delivered without labour. 


Above all though today like every day I’m seeking to do what I love in the service of people who love what I do, and to find personal joy in such work.


Are you doing what you love in the service of people are love what you do? 
And are you radiating joy even when your work is hard.


Do Your Work.


Be remarkable.

Ian

Wednesday, 1 July 2020

Have you made the shifts essential to the new world of work?

Below is my picture of the new world of work from my book 'The Appreciative Leader' that was published in 2016. Should you not have this book you can download it here with my compliments.

What shifts are you still to make?


There has never been a better time in history than to ensure you are on the right side above.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, 29 June 2020

Becoming

This is a great story. I've very much enjoyed reading it and reflecting. I will be adding this book to my recommended reading list.

My overwhelming conclusion is that the Obama's are good humans and that Michelle Obama would be as great a President as her husband though she would never want the role. 

This story is in stark contrast to the current President who doesn't show any humanity and who I think is unbecoming.

Be remarkable.
Ian


Friday, 26 June 2020

Find your voice, sing your song, play your music


I’ve started writing my Heart-leadership book. This post and podcast is from Sparkenation 2 'Hear Your Heart'.

A reminder a sparkenation is "a spark that ignites passion that leads to action that changes what’s normal."

My favourite metaphors for essence are voice, song and music.

I was first introduced to voice/song/music as a metaphor for essence on the day I left hospital following what had been a life-saving operation.

I was 23 years old at the time and as I look back I was very naive then about matters of the heart. 

My doctor had introduced me to the heart-mind-body connection and had begun to teach me meditation something was totally unfamiliar with. He had also taught me a mantra "I have an attitude of gratitude” to help me ensure that I became a survivor of what was then a 1 in 5 chance. I said the mantra out loud in from of a mirror for several days prior to my operation. It's a practice I have continued now for 43 years!

I didn't know it back then that I was beginning to tap into my heart by believing what my doctor was teaching me even though I had very little understanding at the time.

My doctor came to see my wife and I on the day I could finally go home after weeks in hospital. His parting words were “Don’t die with your music locked in you.” 

My wife Carol and I had no idea what he meant!

Later we discovered these were words by the British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli who probably borrowed them from Samuel Beckett. 

This discovery was the beginning of a what has become my life’s work to help people to find your voice, sing your song, play your music.


The Stephen R. Covey book that I recommend the most is ’The 8th Habit From Effectiveness to Greatness’,  which digs deep into this topic of essence.

In this book Covey describes Voice as "unique personal significance - significance that is revealed as we face our greatest challenges and which makes us equal to them."

He says Voice is found at the nexus of talent, need, conscience and passion as illustrated below:

Talent (your natural gifts and strengths), 
Need (including what the world needs enough to pay you for), 
Conscience (that still small voice within that assures you of what is right and that prompts us to actually do it), 
Passion (those things that naturally energise, excite, motivate and inspire you).

What are your natural gifts and strengths?

What needs are you providing that you’re being paid for?

What is that small still voice inside you saying to you on a consistent basis? Are you paying attention?

What naturally energises, excites, motivates and inspires you?

These 5 questions demand answers don’t they.

The world needs you to have found your Voice!


Sometimes we call your Voice Song and sometimes Music.

In many of my online conversations and in person workshops I ask participants to choose a theme song for where their live is heading. Many people immediately get their smart phone out and play their song!

What would your theme song be right now?


Possible Actions You can take to discover your essence (find your voice, sing your song, play your music)

1) Undertake my short online course to discover your essence. It's called ‘Magnificence’ You’ll find it here. 

2) Seek out people you trust and who know you well and ask them to describe in a sentence your character and how they see you at your very best. 

3) Reflect on your life’s work to date. What is it that you love to do more than anything else? What does this tell you about essence?

4) Play with Covey’s insights about your talent, need, conscience and passion and see where it leads you

5) Get used to hearing your heart before you start asking your head anything!

Do Your Work.

Be remarkable.
Ian