Saturday, 3 September 2011

The privilege of our platforms

When Naomi Rhode, RDH, CSP, CPAE Speakers Hall of Fame® was President of the National Speakers Association (USA), her theme was 'The Privilege of the Platform' which I think is very insightful and sadly not understood by many speakers, professional and non-professional, who think it is about them more than the audience.

Speakers or not, just about everyone on earth can have platforms today via blogs, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Google+, you name it, and increasingly through leading our own tribes and participating in others. The possibilities are endless.

Seeing our platforms as a privilege I think is paramount.

Before I post in social media, speak in public or for a client, or engage in whatever way I have opportunity to share my feelings, thoughts, insights, and experience, I ask, will my audience find this of great value? My answer often is no!

I write a minimum of 500 words every single day, usually first thing in the morning. I spend about 20% of my time doing online and in person research. Only a small amount appears here or anywhere else because only a small amount passes my great value test.

Now ultimately only you can be the judge of whether or not what I provide is of great value. I find the discipline of asking the will this be of great value question and always keeping in mind that it is a privilege to share with you, keeps me honest.

Please comment or email me ian@changingwhatsnormal.com if you think what I provide is of great value and equally if you don't think it is.

Be the difference you want to see in the world
Ian
Leader Changing What's Normal Tribe


Sparkenation: a spark that ignites passion that leads to action that changes what's normal

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3 comments:

Gihan Perera said...

This is an insightful and timely post, Ian. Did you see the article in Thursday's Australian Financial Review about the speaking profession? It was highly critical - even scathing - of keynote speakers and even NSAA. Not the sort of press any profession would enjoy!

But if more speakers followed your advice, and started from depth and wisdom first before they "stepped up" to any platform, their audiences, readers and followers would all be better off.

Ian Berry said...

Thank you Gihan. I tried to read the AFR article and couldnt without signing up And you cant do a free trial without giving your credit card which I object to. Anyhow speaking is a methodology I actually don't think it is a profession which doesnt mean we shouldnt be professional And being professional means ensuring what speak will be of value before we speak

Jennifer said...

I would like to tell you that I find your blog really interesting and of good value. I'm a swedish business student and began reading your blog this week due to an assignment in school and I will keep reading it for a couple of weeks. I will try to integrate in the topics you write about and the discussions they might end up in. You will probably see more of my comments very soon! /Jennifer Sandström